Sunday, April 22, 2018

Exploring Augmented Reality with the Merge Cube



If you’ve ever experimented with augmented reality with your students,
you’ve had that feeling of wonder and excitement take over your room!


I have used QR codes and the Aurasma App with my students in the past.
Both are engaging and “totally rad” experiences for my
“technothirsty learners”.


This year we’re exploring the augmented reality using the

Merge Cube

Merge cubes are small, foam created cubes that can transform into many different experiences all with the click of an app!

I was lucky enough to find these unique little gems at my local Walmart on clearance for $1.00 each :)
I've also noticed them at Target for about $15.00 and on Amazon (linked above) for $6.00.

But if you just want to try them out before you purchase them,
you can head over to Jamie Donally's post and get a
free printout from
the Merge VR company.

You might find some glitches with the print out, but it’s worth
a try if you’re “itching” to explore the possibilities
for this augmented reality
resource in your room!

So...how have my students been using
this piece of technology to share their learning?

….right now we’re in the “exploration stage”
of our Merge Cube experiences…
this means my students are using the
different free apps available and exploring
what the technology can help the do.

Here’s some of their discoveries…
 
 
For Earth Day, they worked with partners to snap a
picture of each other holding the earth in their hands.
Since the app doesn’t allow picture taking at this time,
they decided they would take a screenshot and
crop their picture to the size that would work for their creation.
We can use these pictures in future projects…
Poetry about protecting the Earth.
Smash with PicCollage and create an acrostic poem.
Share ways to protect the Earth in Seesaw with audio and labels.

Check out this giant Merge Cube tutorial from Mr. Haydu.

My students enjoyed working with it to get the augmented images larger to snap their photos...but also mentioned that it was harder to play the games where the cube had to be manipulated to move things on the screen.
 


Looking for more information on the Merge Cubes and how educators are using them across the globe, check out Vicki Davis’ post.


We’ll be exploring more with this technology in the future, for sure!
How do you incorporate augmented reality into your lessons?
Comment below and share some of your ideas!



No comments:

Post a Comment